Jamaica

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    The Power Of Lightning

    Over the past two Olympics, the sleepy island of Jamaica has shown itself to be a true power in world athletics. The track and field events in London were dominated by Jamaican athletes for the second Olympics in a row. Jamaica has been producing great athletes for years, but many had left Jamaica at an early age only to represent different nations.

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    Cockpit Country Jamaica

    Christopher Columbus arrived in the Caribbean in 1494, and less than ten years later the slave trade was thriving. In Jamaica, plantations were quickly established and slaves were being shipped in from West Africa on a monthly basis. By 1512, there was already a community of escapee slaves living in the mountains of Jamaica and had earned their own name from the Spanish. Called Maroons, from the Spanish “Cimarron”, meaning fugitive…

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    Jamaican Cuisine Explored

    Jamaica is probably more known for reggae music than food, but there are a wealth of dishes to check out in this very diverse country. From the original people of the island, the Arawak, to African, Spanish, British, Chinese and Indian settlers, Jamaican cuisine has been the recipient of a diverse set of influences. From main course, to drinks and desserts, there is something in Jamaican cuisine for every palate and dietary preference.

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    Goats Head Soup And Jamaica

    What to do after you release the most critically acclaimed album of an already very storied career. If you are the Rolling Stones, you head to Jamaica to record your follow-up. “Why Jamaica?”, you may well ask. Well, as Kieth Richards so wryly put it, “Jamaica was one of the few places that would let us all in! By that time about the only country that I was allowed to exist in was Switzerland, which was damn boring for me…

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    Number One in Jamaica – Toots And The Maytals

    So, which band has the most number one hits in Jamaica. Is it Bob Marley? No. How about Peter Tosh? Not even close. The kings of the Jamaican music scene are reggae legends, Toots and the Maytals. Though never receiving the same popularity as Bob or Peter, Toots and the Maytals hold the record for number one songs in Jamaica, with an incredible 31 chart topping hits. For some unknown reason, Toots and the Maytals were never able to win…

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    Bob Marley Debuts: Catch A Fire

    Bob Marley officially announced his presence to the rest of the world on April 13, 1973, with the release of, Catch a Fire. He was a well known entity in Jamaica, since the 1960s, but it wasn’t until signing with Island Records that Bob Marley would gain international recognition for himself and for the Jamaican music known as Reggae. Though the album was not an immediate success, it was the first step along a road to stardom for Bob Marley.

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    Jamaica’s Road To The 1998 World Cup

    Jamaica is not just a beautiful country, but it has also produced some of the greatest athletes in the world. In fact, the world of sprinting has been dominated in the past two and a half decades by athletes from Jamaica. The current world record holder, Usain Bolt, was born in Trelawny, Jamaica. Besides track and field, the two most popular sports there are cricket and soccer. Cricket is the most popular spectator sport..

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    Jamaican Birth Rituals

    In any culture, birth and death are a doorway in and out of life on this earth. How each civilization chooses to behave before, during and after the event is an indicator of the unique belief system of the ethnicity. The Jamaican culture has been influenced by traditions from West Africa, Spain, France, Britain and the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean.

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    Jamaica’s Role In The Emancipation Proclamation

    Slavery was a mainstay in the Caribbean for well over 250 years, and in some regions continued even into the 20th century. In Jamaica, there were hundreds of plantations all successfully producing millions of pounds of sugar every year – utilizing nothing but slave labour. By 1831, the word ’emancipation’ had been thrown around by those advocating for the slaves; but not much had actually changed.

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    A Historic Bathing Club In Montego Bay

    During the latter years of the 19th century it became quite popular for well-to-do ladies and gentlemen to frequent health spas, particularly hot springs in tropical locations. Doctors were known to prescribe long rituals of bathing and ingestion of spring waters. During the same era, travel to the European colonies in the Caribbean was also a mark of wealth and leisure. Doctor Alexander McCatty opted to form his own sanatorium of sorts…

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    A Caribbean Pirate’s Watery Grave

    Ah Jamaica, that vibrant island nation in the Caribbean that has become synonymous with Reggae music, pirate legends and dark rum. Before Christopher Columbus arrived in 1494, Jamaica was peaceful and populated by indigenous peoples who had migrated from South America. There were more than 200 villages on the island when Columbus arrived, most around the would-be main point of entry, Port Royal.

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